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Summer 2019 Happenings

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Published Jul 1, 2019 8:00 AM


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT / Sports / Alumni Events


Sarah Lucas, Get Hold of This, 1994.

Sarah Lucas: Au Naturel


Courtesy of The Hammer Museum.

Initially associated with a group known as the Young British Artists (YBAs), who began exhibiting together in London in the late 1980s, Lucas is now one of the UK’s most influential artists. Bringing together more than 130 works in photography, collage, sculpture and installation, Sarah Lucas: Au Naturel reveals the breadth and ingenuity of the artist’s practice. The exhibition addresses the ways in which Lucas’ works engage with crucial debates about gender and power — with a particular attentiveness to the legacy of surrealism — from her clever modifications to everyday objects to her exploration of sexual ambiguity and the tension between the mundanely familiar and the disorientingly strange.

THROUGH SEPT. 1. Location: Hammer Museum. Admission: Free. Phone: (310) 443-7000. Web: hammer.ucla.edu

Hammer Projects: Andrea Fraser

For this work, Fraser created a script from a little-known Pacifica Radio archival recording of four men articulating their affinities with and support for feminism and women’s rights. Fraser performs this group discussion as a one-woman show, a move that complicates the institution of gender through dramatic acting and discursive production. This slippage in and out of personas finds Fraser highlighting how socially defined identities shape the enactment of our politics.

THROUGH SEPT. 15. Location: Hammer Museum. Admission: Free. Phone: (310) 443-7000. Web: hammer.ucla.edu

Guatemalan Masks: Selections from the Jim and Jeanne Pieper Collection


Left to right) Bull Mask, late 19th– early 20th century; Dragon Mask, early-mid-20th century; Dead Spaniard Mask, early 20th century.

This exhibition features 80 masks depicting animals, folk personae and historical figures that are deeply rooted in Guatemalan religiosity and popular culture. Throughout the country, people perform spectacular masquerades during indigenous festivals, Catholic feast days and secular events. These public dance-dramas are jubilant expressions of devotion and community identity.

THROUGH OCT. 6. Location: Fowler Museum. Admission: Free. Phone: (310) 825-4361. Web: fowler.ucla.edu

Witch


Courtesy of the Geffen Playhouse.

Simon Helberg is featured in this fiendishly funny new play by Jen Silverman. A charming devil arrives in the quiet village of Edmonton to bargain for the souls of its residents in exchange for their darkest wishes. Elizabeth should be his easiest target, having been labeled a “witch” and cast out by the town, but her soul is not so readily bought. An inventive retelling of a Jacobean drama, this sharp, subversive fable debates how much our souls are worth when hope is hard to come by.

AUG. 20–SEPT. 29. Location: Audrey Skirball Kenis Theater, Geffen Playhouse. Tickets: TBD. Phone: (310) 208-5454. Web: www.geffenplayhouse.org

Skintight

Hanging on by a thread after her ex-husband gets engaged to a much younger woman, Jodi (Tony Award-winner Idina Menzel) retreats to her dad’s swanky Manhattan townhouse. But rather than the comforts of home, she instead finds her aging father’s new live-in boyfriend, Trey — who is 20. In his new comedy, Joshua Harmon brings neurotic family drama to the forefront as father and daughter contend with the age-old questions of how to age gracefully in a world obsessed with youth and where love fits into it all.

SEPT. 3–OCT. 6. Location: Gil Cates Theater, Geffen Playhouse. Tickets: TBD. Phone: (310) 208-5454. Web: www.geffenplayhouse.org

Adam Linder: THE WANT

Inspired by the Client/Dealer relationship from Bernard-Marie Koltès’ play In the Solitude of Cotton Fields, THE WANT is a contemporary opera — with music by Ethan Braun and lighting design by Shahryar Nashal — that fuses vocal expression with a rich physicality. The libretto, littered with interjections from Jacques Derrida to Missy Elliott, contemplates the desire, vulnerability and cunning at the heart of any transaction. The singers, actors and dancers — Jess Gadani, Justin F. Kennedy, Jasmine Orpilla and Roger Sala Reyner — are “Offerors” and “Offerees,” enrobed as the key archetypes of mercantile Europe and the spiritual tradition of constant trade between a reflexive mind and a sensuous being.

SEPT. 19–SEPT. 22. Location: REDCAT. Tickets: TBD. Phone: (310) 825-2101. Web: cap.ucla.edu

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